What’s Your Speed of TRUST?

Stephen M. R. CoveyIn 2006, my good friend Stephen M.R. Covey wrote his international best-seller, Speed of TrustThe One Thing That Changes Everything.

“Trust is common to every individual, relationship, team, family, organization, nation, economy and civilization is the least understood, most neglected and underestimated possibility of our time.”

Stephen also makes this critical observation: “Trust impacts us 24/7, 365 days a year. It affects the quality of every relationship, every communication, every work project, every business venture, every effort in which we are engaged.”

From my own marketing experience … all 349 pages of that remarkable book can be summed up with this Marketing Formula: 

[Predictability] x [Frequency] = “Accelerated” Trust 

In other words, the more “frequently” you prove your “predictability” … the faster you build your speed Trust.  And there’s no better recent example than on the blog (AlexMandossian.com) you’re visiting right now.

Because of my “busy” schedule, I made the egregious mistake of posting only one time between April 10th and April 29th.

How egregious of a mistake was it?

According to my Blog Traffic Manager – Cathy Perkins, my total number of unique visitors dwindled from April’s high of 2,005 visitors a day (on 4/11) to the month’s low of 479 visitors per day (on 4/27).

Do the math.  I did … and I quickly discovered how by not posting with “predictable frequency” I lost the Trust of over 75% of my students.

Shame on me.

And so in the spirit of regaining that Trust (perhaps even with you, my reader), I’m making a public declaration right here, right now on this blog post.

Ready?

Okay, here it is: “I intend to publish blog posts twice a week (at least) from this day forward.”

End of story :-)

When you come to think about it, it’s not too difficult to post twice a week on a blog, no matter how busy you are.  You have a couple of options that can almost instantly boost the productivity of your weekly blog posting capacity.

Of course, the simplest option is to pre-write several pairs of blog posts a few weeks at a time.  Easy.  Another option I favor even more is to reach out to students and clients and ask them to submit posts on a “topic of expertise.”

My topic of expertise is the tagline of my header on this blog.  Check it out now because it reads: “Practical Marketing Tips for Information Publishers, Small Business Owners and Entrepreneurial CEOs.”

So … if you’re a “poster child” student of mine from any of my Virtual Book Tour Secrets, Teleseminar Secrets, Stick Strategy Secrets or Traffic Conversion Secrets tele-courses, please notify me (in the “Comments” section below) that you’d like to become a “contibuting Editor” on this blog.

Sound good?

After you do, I’ll have one of my Team Members contact you directly (within a few days) to find out if you qualify.

Key Point: Please do not include your phone number in your comment.  If you’re a student in good standing, we’ll find your number in our database.

Above all, remember “Predictability x Frequency = Trust.”  That’s also true for bloggers, stay-at-home moms, kids, bosses, clergy, Entrepreneurial CEOs and anyone else you can think of.

I hope my “knee-skinning” experience in between April 10th and 29th (20 days of not posting)  has taught you the lesson of why it’s critically important post predictability and frequently.

By doing so. you’ll give your students, prospects, clients or customers more “marketing food” to devour week after week so you will obtain (and maintain) the one thing that changes everything: Trust.

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  1. […] predict my behavior and grow to trust me.  To learn more about this, check out Alex’s May 1st post where he talks about how predictability and frequency impacts trust and what happened when he […]

  2. […] predict my behavior and grow to trust me.  To learn more about this, check out Alex’s May 1st post where he talks about how predictability and frequency impacts trust and what happened when he […]

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